The Hypatia Project consortium is always on the lookout for the latest resources on the topic of gender-inclusiveness and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). Here is our third volume presenting what’s driving European and global conversations.

 
Hypatia Project

Interim Evaluation: Gender equality as a crosscutting issue in Horizon 2020


"This report is a long version of the one that was submitted by the “Commission Expert Group1 on the interim evaluation of Gender equality as a crosscutting issue in Horizon 2020” to contribute to the overall interim evaluation of Horizon 2020 as set in Article 32 of the Horizon 2020 Framework Regulation. This report aims to identify possible improvements in the implementation of gender equality (GE) as a crosscutting issue in Horizon 2020. It assists the European Commission (EC) in assessing gender equality, and – in particular – the gender dimension in research and innovation (R&I) content, as a crosscutting issue at the various stages of the implementation of Horizon 2020 from the Work Programme (WP) definition to the funded projects. It aims to provide a solid evidence base for designing future activities and initiatives, in particular the preparation of the ex- ante impact assessment of the next Framework Programme (FP) for Research and Innovation."
 
 
Hypatia Project

Women in the Digital Age (EU Report)


"This study aims to identify key factors and trends in the participation of women in ICT and its dynamics and analyses the practices enabling women's participation in the digital world. 57% of tertiary graduates in the EU are women, but only 24.9% of them graduate in ICT-related fields, and very few enter the sector. Women make up 13% of the graduates in ICT-related fields working in digital jobs compared to 15% in 2011. Globally, figures indicate that women's participation in the ICT and digital sector are not improving significantly. Data trends and qualitative analysis suggest that gender inequality in the digital sphere is essentially a result of the persistence of strong unconscious biases about what is appropriate and what capacities each gender has, as well as about the technologies themselves. Therefore, to address this situation, cultural change and initiatives at micro level can help develop female digital entrepreneurship. If existing biases are not addressed, rapid economic advances achieved by digital transformation will not take into account existing gender gap in the sector which will simply amplify and, possibly perpetuate gender stereotypes."
 
 
Hypatia Project

Implicit bias in academia: A challenge to the meritocratic principle and to women’s careers – And what to do about it


"This paper looks at the role of implicit bias as a mechanism behind the gender gap and a potential threat to academic meritocracy. It focuses on implicit gender bias, examining how it plays a role in working conditions for women at universities, in recruitment and career advancement processes, and in research funding situations. Universities, it is argued, can and do take action to mitigate and eliminate gender bias in their organisations. Evidence for bias is reviewed, examples of action at LERU universities are given, and nine recommendations for universities and other organisations and policy makers are formulated.In the special issue of the European Integration online Papers (EIoP), the authors reconsider the practicability of gender mainstreaming in the European Union (EU) and its traction in the European integration project more broadly. The paper argues that the EU is a battleground where gender equality concerns must struggle against a masculine stronghold. They question whether there are better means to bring about gender mainstreaming’s transformative triumph. By Elaine Weiner and Heather MacRae."
 
 
Hypatia Project

Should I Stay or Should I go?: Women’s Implicit Stereotypic Associations Predict their Commitment and Fit in STEM


"Gender stereotypes that associate science and technology to men more than women create subtle barriers to women’s advancement in these fields. But how do stereotypic associations, when internalized by women, relate to their own sense of fit and organizational commitment? Our research is the first to demonstrate that, among working engineers, women’s own gender stereotypic implicit associations predict lower organizational commitment. In a sample of 263 engineers (145 women), women (but not men) who implicitly associated engineering with men more than women were less committed to their organization. This relationship was mediated by lower self-efficacy and value-fit, and not explained by other personality, demographic, or organizational factors. We discuss how internalized cultural biases can constrain women’s experiences in STEM."
 
 
Hypatia Project

The gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented?


"Women comprise a minority of the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine (STEMM) workforce. Quantifying the gender gap may identify fields that will not reach parity without intervention, reveal underappreciated biases, and inform benchmarks for gender balance among conference speakers, editors, and hiring committees. Using the PubMed and arXiv databases, we estimated the gender of 36 million authors from >100 countries publishing in >6000 journals, covering most STEMM disciplines over the last 15 years, and made a web app allowing easy access to the data (https://lukeholman.github.io/genderGap/). Despite recent progress, the gender gap appears likely to persist for generations, particularly in surgery, computer science, physics, and maths. The gap is especially large in authorship positions associated with seniority, and prestigious journals have fewer women authors. Additionally, we estimate that men are invited by journals to submit papers at approximately double the rate of women. Wealthy countries, notably Japan, Germany, and Switzerland, had fewer women authors than poorer ones. We conclude that the STEMM gender gap will not close without further reforms in education, mentoring, and academic publishing."
 
 
Hypatia Project

Gender pay gap: what we learned and how to fix it


The UK is the first in the world to request detailed data about the gender pay gap form private companies to establish a thorough assessment of the situation. "While the figures do not reflect equal pay for equal work, they do raise questions about structural inequalities in the workforce and may hold the answer to closing the gap." The Guardian